Logos – Pathos – Ethos – Oh My! Podcast 31

By Melody Pickle, Writing Specialist, WAC, Kaplan University

Writing an Effective Thesis (Girl with Headphones)

©JupiterImages 2013

Join Kurtis Clements for another Effective Writing Podcast- The Three Appeals of Argumentative Writing as he explains clear strategies for using Logos, Ethos, and Pathos in argument writing.   In this podcast, Kurtis uses the terms argument and persuasion interchangeably as he explains how to structure an effective argument.  The specific examples  help writers avoid common persuasion pitfalls.  Understanding how to structure an argument for a particular purpose and audience is an important skill for all fields of study and job markets. Persuasion skills are used when structuring a professional business proposal and when writing a letter to the editor of the local paper.  Persuasive writing skills help writers effect change.  Understanding Logos, Pathos, and Ethos is key.

In a recent post, Chrissine Rios referenced Aristotle’s three argument appeals in her post Providing Feedback  on Faith-based Claims in Persuasive Essays. Podcast 31 explains these appeals in detail.  Listen to the latest Effective Writing Podcast episode 31 –  The Three Appeals of Argumentative Writing.

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One response to “Logos – Pathos – Ethos – Oh My! Podcast 31

  1. Thank you for the definitions and examples in this podcast! I have noticed that pathos is the most popular of the three types of appeals I see in casual conversations on social media and even in more reputable, traditionally “hard news” sources in discussing current events and issues. Does anyone see the same preference for pathos happening in academic writing with students or among colleagues?

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